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I've had several questions lately about car seat laws in various states. If you're not sure what your state requires in terms of car seat and booster use, please check out the State by State Car Seat Laws page. Many states are moving toward the federal recommendations for car seat and booster use, which suggests that children should be in rear-facing car seats to at least one year old and 20 lbs.; in a harnessed forward-facing car seat until about age 4 or until the harnessed car seat is outgrown; and in a booster seat until about age 8, 80 lbs., and 4'9" tall.

If your state's car seat laws are nowhere near the federal recommendations, remember that it is not illegal to go above and beyond those minimum standards set forth in the law. Many child passenger safety advocates now recommend extended rear-facing and extended harnessing because those methods have been shown to keep children safer.

If your state has recently updated its car seat or booster seat laws, please email me and let me know so the pages can be updated quickly!
Comments
May 15, 2010 at 1:00 pm
(1) Janice Griffin says:

What are the age or weight limits in Florida?

July 8, 2010 at 6:08 pm
(2) Chandal says:

I was wondering what the laws in South Dakota are. My son is 8 months old hes 25 lbs + and 28 1/2 inches long the last time he was checked at just shy of 7 months. when he is facing backwards in the car seat his legs hit the back of the seat and looks really uncomfy. this seems like it would be more dangerous in an accident than him sitting forwards…

January 23, 2014 at 7:20 am
(3) fred laurin says:

i heard that a baby cannot be in a snowsuit when riding in a carseat. is this true or just recommended because of the thickness of the suit?

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